liquefied WORLD

 
 

How will history judge us?

All transcendence has disappeared, the natural world has been liquidated and substituted for an artificial one.  Over the past several centuries, humanity has raked the land of its resources, threatening the balance of the natural world. The nature of the earnings that define late capitalism have incidentally raped us of nature itself.  The accelerating rate products are consumed, replaced, burned up and thrown out put an inexplicable strain on the environment.   We pride ourselves on industrialization manufactured from the bones of a dying world in the name of progress.  History, a forgotten memory, a re-written story, has rendered the mechanisms of exploitation so complicated that blame is hard to place but scapecoats easy to pin.  Harm here is here there.  The postindustrial dilemma hinging happiness on consumption employs an ignorance that is no longer a haven to bliss, but threat to sustainability. The stakes are high with there being no end in sight for industrial expansion. As desertification and extreme weather patterns delimitates habitable and uninhabitable zones, it is clear that the earth can’t eternally withstand the strain of the industrialized world. Central to this work is the question of human survival in relation to nature and a global environment increasingly defined by unpredictability.  HEYDT’s large-format color photographs of mines, landfills, deforestation and other scarred landscapes document in a perversely beautiful way the horrifying ramifications of industry on the natural world. 

All transcendence has disappeared, the natural world has been liquidated and substituted for an artificial one.  How will history judge us?  Over the past several centuries, humanity has raked the land of its resources, threatening the balance of the natural world. The nature of the earnings that define late capitalism have incidentally raped us of nature itself. We pride ourselves on industrialization manufactured from the bones of a dying world.  Harm here is harm there.  The postindustrial dilemma hinging happiness on consumption employs an ignorance that is no longer a haven to bliss, but a threat to sustainability.  The accelerating rate products are produced and replaced put an inexplicable strain on the environment, while the mechanisms of exploitation are so complicated that blame’s impossible to place, but scape-coats easy to pin.  With there being no end in sight for industrial expansion, the stakes are high, as desertification, extreme weather patterns and wars over resources increasingly define habitable and uninhabitable zones.   Central to this work is the transformation of the global landscape under the myth of progress.  HEYDT’s large-format color photographs of mines, landfills, deforestation and other scarred landscapes document in a beautiful and grotesque way the horrifying ramifications of industry on aworld reduced to a bottom line.